2017

Glimmer of hope

2017 has been a year of suffering and distress for millions of refugees and displaced. We have caught some of the moments that give hope.

The Norwegian Refugee Council is an independent humanitarian organisation helping people forced to flee. We work in crises across 31 countries, where we help save lives and rebuild futures.

Read caption Jonathan (middle) supervises Gabriel, one of Umoja Radio 92.3 FM's hosts in Nyarugusu camp, broadcasts live to millions of listeners around the globe. Photo: Ingrid Prestetun/NRC

TANZANIA

The Radioman

Journalists are often harassed and arrested in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Tanzania. That didn’t stop Jonathan from starting his own radio station.

When Jonathan from DR Congo first arrived in Tanzania’s Nyarugusu refugee camp in 1997, he was wary. There was little information circulating about issues affecting the camp´s residents. In Nyarugusu, one of the largest refugee camps in the world, things were happening. But nobody knew about them.

Read the full story here.

Read caption Second grade Afghan and Iranian schoolgirls sit side by side at Kowsar School, near Kerman city. Photo: Marjan Jesmi/NRC

IRAN

First day of school

Afghan schoolchildren are joining their Iranian peers on the first day of school.

It’s 23 September, first day of autumn. The day when, after three months of summer break, schoolgirls and boys throughout Iran return to a new year of studies. Over the past three years, Iranian public schools have also opened their doors to Afghan children without legal documentation – children who would otherwise not have the right to attend school. 

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Read caption Douaa Sakhnini with her daughter Sara. Sakhnini had to drop out of university when she became a mother, but now in Greece she's become the breadwinner for her family. Photo: Maria Gounaridou/NRC

GREECE

Once a dropout, now a teacher

The Syrian war has turned many lives upside down. For Douaa Sakhnini, it has also reversed traditional gender roles.

At 18 years old, Douaa Sakhnini got married. At 19, she enrolled in university. At 20, she had her first child and dropped out to become a full-time mother. She watched with envy as her friends graduated and got jobs.

Read the full story here.

Read caption “I was told that grade 9 is very difficult, and it’s not easy to pass it especially since I attend the second shift schools in the afternoon for Syrian refugees. But, I wasn’t afraid at all when I sat for the official exams. The questions were easy,” says Yasmine, 17. Photo: Nadine Malli/NRC

LEBANON

Education first

As the Syrian crisis is in its seventh year accessing formal education is still difficult for refugees. Hundred thousands of children are deprived from education opportunities as they are forced to help their families make ends meet. However, for 17-year old Yasmine* and her family education remains a top priority.

“I was told that grade 9 is very difficult, and it’s not easy to pass it especially since I attend the second shift schools in the afternoon for Syrian refugees. But, I wasn’t afraid at all when I sat for the official exams. The questions were easy,” says Yasmine.

Read the full story here.

Read caption Thirteen-year-old Namuya (left) comes from a pastoralist family so growing up, her schooling was sporadic. Now she's catching up to her peers with the help of NRC. Photo: Fatuma Abdullahi/NRC

KENYA

Giving girls a second chance

Using a catch-up learning model in Kenya’s Kakuma refugee camp provides young girls flexibility in learning.

All children have a right to education, and children who have been forced to flee their homes are no exception. Providing education opportunities for crisis-affected children entails more than helping them develop academic skills. It protects them through a safe learning environment, improves their nutrition through meals at school, and gives young people hope for a better future

Read the full story here.

Read caption Linda and Vanessa are two of thousands refugee children who have participated in non-formal education classes through the Norwegian Refugee Council. Photo: Racha El Daoi/Flyktninghjelpen

LEBANON

Back to school

Linda and Vanessa are two of thousands refugee children who have participated in non-formal education classes through the Norwegian Refugee Council. These classes prepare children who are not in school, for enrolment in public schools in Lebanon.

In 2016, their mother Amira fled to Lebanon to find safety with her family. At first it was difficult. Her daughters were upset and stressed. Amira worried about them missing school, and depriving them of an education altogether. However, during a walk at a nearby park Amira saw a sign about the summer education program at NRC's nearby community center. She contacted the staff who enrolled her children immediately.

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Read caption Naw Su Phaw, 24, pauses at her sewing machine in Dawei, south-east Myanmar. Photo: Ingrid Prestetun/NRC

MYANMAR

Tailoring a future

She used to work long, exhausting days in the fields for Burmese landowners. Now, Naw Su Phaw wants to be her own boss.

A steady, mechanical sound buzzes from 30 manually operated sewing machines, blending in with eager chatter and laughter.

I’m visiting the Norwegian Refugee Council’s (NRC) education centre for youth in Dawei, a small town in south-east Myanmar.

Read the full story here.

Read caption Ten-year-old Diane impatiently awaits the completion of her new school. She often visits the construction site to check in on the progress. Photo: Ingrid Prestetun/NRC

TANZANIA

Fulfilling dreams

For the first time since she fled the violence in Burundi, Diane will have a safe learning environment again. Along with hundreds of thousands of Burundians, she has sought safety in Tanzania with her family.

“I hope I will get teachers who make me laugh, like those that I had in Burundi,” says Diane. “I want to study very hard so I can become a teacher, too.”

Read the full story here.