Sangamai Teka, 41, walks to the small plot of land where she plants "ndembe" (red beans).  She and several other female farmers who were displaced during the Greater Kasai conflict of 2016-2017 have returned to less than they had before.   Many of these women have lost children and spouses to the conflict.  All of them struggle to make a living to sustain their families.

Over 1 million people have returned to their homes in Kasai-Central after a year of violent conflict within the province and across the Greater Kasai Region.  Unfortunately, people who have returned have found their homes and fields pillaged and burned to the ground.  These farming communities have no shelter, no food to eat and no means of sustaining any viable livelihood.

Earlier this year, NRC visited Mbulungu and Bakuakashila, two villages ravaged by the regional conflict in 2017.  NRC used its “community-based approach” by consulting with these communities to better understand their primary needs, to properly target the most vulnerable people and facilitate their ability to choose the assistance they require.

This intervention, however, is only a drop in the ocean of the vast needs of this community.  NRC is currently the only humanitarian actor in the zone and funding is not enough to address other acute needs such as food assistance, household items and education.  The Humanitarian Response Plan is currently only 25 per cent funded eight months into the year.  Humanitarian capacity is critically low.  If donors do not act now for the people of Mbulungu and for the rest of DR Congo, it will be too late.

August 29, 2018- Kasai-Central Province, DR Congo
Photo : NRC/Aléxis Huguet
DR Congo

Braving the run

"I had to bury them right there, in the bush." While on the run, Congolese mother Sangamai Teka experienced the unimaginable pain a mother should never have to go through – losing her children.

The bloody conflict between armed groups spilled into the tiny village of Mbulungu in the southern Congolese province of Kasai-Central in March 2017. Horrific violence forced 95 per cent of the population to run up to 85 kilometres into the deep forest and hide for months, for fear of being killed. Homes, schools and health centres were burned and pillaged.

Sangamai Teka, 41, and her nine children had no choice but to flee deep into the forest. Her husband ran in another direction, and Sangamai hasn’t seen him since.

Sangamai Teka, a 41-year-old farmer and mother of 9 children (two children died while they were in exile in the forest), poses with five of her children in front of her new NRC-funded home in Mbulungu village. 

Since the attack, by armed groups, on the village in March of 2017, she has been alone and does not know the whereabouts of her husband. 

"When the war came, we ran for refuge in the forest," she explained. "There we had nothing to eat and we all got sick. Of the nine children I had, two died. I had to bury them in the forest." 

Sangamai is one of the beneficiaries of the cash-for-shelter program launched by NRC in 2017. 

Over 1 million people have returned to their homes in Kasai-Central after a year of violent conflict within the province and across the Greater Kasai Region.  Unfortunately, people who have returned have found their homes and fields pillaged and burned to the ground.  These farming communities have no shelter, no food to eat and no means of sustaining any viable livelihood.

Earlier this year, NRC visited Mbulungu and Bakuakashila, two villages ravaged by the regional conflict in 2017.  NRC used its “community-based approach” by consulting with these communities to better understand their primary needs, to properly target the most vulnerable people and facilitate their ability to choose the assistance they require.

This intervention, however, is only a drop in the ocean of the vast needs of this community.  NRC is currently the only humanitarian actor in the zone and funding is not enough to address other acute needs such as food assistance, household items and education.  The Humanitarian Response Plan is currently only 25 per cent funded eight months into the year.  Humanitarian capacity is critically low.  If donors do not act now for the people of Mbulungu and for the rest of DR Congo, it will be too late.

August 29, 2018- Kasai-Central Province, DR Congo
Photo : NRC/Aléxis Huguet
Read caption Sangamai Teka together with five of her children in front of her new NRC-funded home in Mbulungu village. Photo: Aléxis Huguet/NRC

Starved to death

While in hiding in the forest, Sangamai tried to adequately feed her children with whatever food she could find. Her efforts were not enough: Two of her children became severely malnourished. In the end, they starved to death.

Most of her other children became very sick. She had to bury her two deceased children right there in the bush and swallow her enormous pain, so she could care for the children she had left.

Sangamai’s story, unfortunately, is not uncommon for the people that survived the conflict in Mbulungu.

"After giving birth, I suffered with these children because I couldn't find anything to eat. I didn't have anyone. I was alone," Elamegi recalled.  "When we finally got out of the forest, I had nothing left. My house had been burned down. I didn't get anything back." 

Elamegi is one of the beneficiaries of the shelter reconstruction assistance programme launched by NRC. 

Before the conflict, only six per cent of the people living in the Mbulungu area were living on one meal or less a day.  After the conflict, nearly half of the population who has returned are living one meal or less per day.

The Greater Kasai Region has the highest rate of malnutrition in the country with 770,000 children under the age of five living with acute malnutrition—440,000 of which suffer from severe acute malnutrition.  Unfortunately, food isn’t the only exigent need in this region.

In early 2017, NRC visited Mbulungu where they met with the community to understand their primary needs.  NRC used its “community-based approach” by consulting with these communities to better understand their primary needs, to properly target the most vulnerable people and facilitate their ability to choose the assistance they require.

This intervention, however, is only a drop in the ocean of the vast needs of this community.  NRC is currently the only humanitarian actor in the zone and funding is not enough to address other acute needs such as food assistance, household items and education.  The Humanitarian Response Plan is currently only 25 per cent funded eight months into the year.  Humanitarian capacity is critically low.  If donors do not act now for the people of Mbulungu and for the rest of DR Congo, it will be too late.

August 29, 2018, Kasai-Central Province, DR Congo
Photo: NRC/Aléxis Huguet
Read caption Elamegi Kankologo holds her baby in her arms. One of her children was killed during the conflict. Photo: Aléxis Huguet/NRC

Twenty-six-year-old Elamegi Kankolongo is holding her one-week-old daughter, Simba, as her 18-month-old twins cling to her. Her new-born is visibly underweight, and her twins are showing classic signs of malnourishment. She, too, lost a child during the conflict in Mbulungu.

"The child — they [militants] killed him, and then I ran into the bush," she repeats tentatively.  Elamegi was two months pregnant when the fighting broke out. She spent six months in the bush by herself — each day a struggle to survive — using the plants and seeds she found to feed herself along the way. Alone, in that forest, she gave birth to her twin boy and girl, Mbuyi and Kanku. For the next few months, she foraged for food to feed her newborns.

We didn’t eat. We slept in the bush. We would go to sleep starving and wake up starving.
Elamegi Kankolongo, 26

Going home

In June 2017, militants were finally driven out of the village. Sangamai recalls the moment she knew it was safe enough to return home. 

"We came out because they [peacekeepers] came to look for us in the bush. They told us: Come out! Come out! Come out!"

She gathered her children and journeyed through the forest back to Mbulungu to continue her life right where she had left off.  But she found her sleepy village unrecognisable — looking like an uninhabited war zone.  Everything she knew had been totally destroyed or pillaged.

View of the ruins of an administrative building in the village of Mbulungu. In early 2017, armed militias took control of the area. They systematically destroyed official buildings and attacked government officials. 

Over 1 million people have returned to their homes in Kasai-Central after a year of violent conflict within the province and across the Greater Kasai Region.  Unfortunately, people who have returned have found their homes and fields pillaged and burned to the ground.  These farming communities have no shelter, no food to eat and no means of sustaining any viable livelihood.

Earlier this year, NRC visited Mbulungu and Bakuakashila, two villages ravaged by the regional conflict in 2017.  NRC used its “community-based approach” by consulting with these communities to better understand their primary needs, to properly target the most vulnerable people and facilitate their ability to choose the assistance they require.

This intervention, however, is only a drop in the ocean of the vast needs of this community.  NRC is currently the only humanitarian actor in the zone and funding is not enough to address other acute needs such as food assistance, household items and education.  The Humanitarian Response Plan is currently only 25 per cent funded eight months into the year.  Humanitarian capacity is critically low.  If donors do not act now for the people of Mbulungu and for the rest of DR Congo, it will be too late.

August 29, 2018 - Kasai-Central Province, DR Congo 
Photo: NRC/Aléxis Huguet
Read caption View of the ruins of an administrative building in the village of Mbulungu. In early 2017, armed militias took control of the area. They systematically destroyed official buildings and attacked government officials. Photo: Aléxis Huguet/NRC

800,000 children suffer from malnutrition

The precarious food security situation has led, inevitably, to malnutrition. According to UNICEF, nearly 800,000 children under the age of five in the Kasai region are acutely malnourished —400,000 of whom suffer from severe acute malnutrition.

Most of the residents of Mbulungu are agriculturalists who grow food to sell in local markets or to sustain themselves. Sangamai Teka used to farm a plot of land and used the produce grown to feed her children.

"We went to the field every day, " she says, recalling the time before the war.  "We farmed cassava and corn.  We would come from the field with that kind of food and use it to feed our children."

Sangamai Teka and her friend, Therèse Galula, work a field for a land owner in Mbulungu.  They are paid with meagre amounts of food for their labour.  Sangamai is a recipient of NRC's cash-for-shelter program launched in Kasai-Central in 2017.

Over 1 million people have returned to their homes in Kasai-Central after a year of violent conflict within the province and across the Greater Kasai Region.  Unfortunately, people who have returned have found their homes and fields pillaged and burned to the ground.  These farming communities have no shelter, no food to eat and no means of sustaining any viable livelihood.

Earlier this year, NRC visited Mbulungu and Bakuakashila, two villages ravaged by the regional conflict in 2017.  NRC used its “community-based approach” by consulting with these communities to better understand their primary needs, to properly target the most vulnerable people and facilitate their ability to choose the assistance they require.

This intervention, however, is only a drop in the ocean of the vast needs of this community.  NRC is currently the only humanitarian actor in the zone and funding is not enough to address other acute needs such as food assistance, household items and education.  The Humanitarian Response Plan is currently only 25 per cent funded eight months into the year.  Humanitarian capacity is critically low.  If donors do not act now for the people of Mbulungu and for the rest of DR Congo, it will be too late.
Read caption Sangamai Teka and her friend, Therèse Galula, work a field for a land owner in Mbulungu. They are paid with meagre amounts of food for their labour. Sangamai is a recipient of NRC's cash-for-shelter program launched in Kasai-Central in 2017. Photo: Aléxis Huguet/NRC

As many as 90 per cent of the region’s population can no longer access their own fields and many have no access to seeds or tools.  Some, out of sheer desperation, have taken to consuming the few seeds they are able to access because they are at the point of starvation.  Before the conflict, only six per cent of the population in Mbulungu lived on one meal or less a day.  After the conflict, that figure jumped to 50 per cent.

"I breastfeed my children because I have no way to provide [solid] food for them," laments Elamegi as her she looks at her one-and-a-half-year-old twins.  "The little children haven’t even grown."

NRC team meeting with residents of Mbulungu village. 

Nearly 17,000 people—or close to 95 per cent of Mbulungu’s population was forced to flee into the forest when fighting broke out between armed groups in March and April of 2017.  Some had to walk up to seven days to find a safe place to hide.  Many lost family members, were assaulted and nearly starved to death while on the move.  All lived in horrific conditions not certain of whether or not life would ever return to normal.

Though calm has returned to Mbulungu and several villages and towns just like it across Kasai-Central, people are not able to continue their lives as normal.  The violent conflict of 2017 left mass destruction in its wake—homes, markets, schools, sanitation facilities and health infrastructure in complete disarray.  In fact, 67 per cent of families living in Mbulungu do not have access to proper latrines and 55 per cent have no access to soap.  These absence of these basic necessities coupled with malnutrition and lack of proper shelter can lead to a host of diseases and death.

For that reason, NRC visited Mbulungu, in early 2017, where they met with the community to understand their primary needs.  NRC used its “community-based approach” by consulting with these communities to better understand their primary needs, to properly target the most vulnerable people and facilitate their ability to choose the assistance they require.

This intervention, however, is only a drop in the ocean of the vast needs of this community.  NRC is currently the only humanitarian actor in the zone and funding is not enough to address other acute needs such as food assistance, household items and education.  The Humanitarian Response Plan is currently only 25 per cent funded eight months into the year.  Humanitarian capacity is critically low.  If donors do not act now for the people of Mbulungu and for the rest of DR Congo, it will be too late.

August 29, 2018, Kasai-Central Province, DR Congo. 
Photo: NRC/Aléxis Huguet
Read caption NRC's team with residents of Mbulungu village. Photo: Aléxis Huguet/NRC
Needs in DR Congo
  • Donors need to prioritise the plight of people who have returned to their homes as neglecting this segment of people in need could put them at risk of re-displacement and/or intercommunal disputes over meagre resources.
  • International donors, particularly those who pledged to assist in funding the humanitarian response in DR Congo, must step up their efforts to ensure that the Response Plan is funded to at least 60 per cent by the end of 2018. 13.1 million lives depend on it.
  • Beef up funding and capacity in sectors such as nutrition and shelter to ensure that people in need in Kasai-Central have a place to live and people and, particularly young children, receive adequate levels of nutrition.  Otherwise, there is a risk of further illness and death.
  • Longer-term funding for programming serving returnees so that people returning to their homes can do so sustainably.


Lack of funding threatens lives

Funding for humanitarian needs is thin across the country, let alone the Greater Kasai Region.  The total Humanitarian Response Plan for DR Congo is only 27 per cent funded nine months into the year, with shelter being the lowest funded sector in the entire response.

"We are happy to serve communities like Mbulungu, but we cannot do it alone," says our Country Director in DR Congo, Ulrika Blom. "It is an utter shame that there isn’t enough funding to reinforce capacity to meet needs. If this doesn’t change, and fast, people will die."

The lack of adequate resources is also a concern raised by the people in the region.  Many mention that there is so little assistance that they fear that it could cause fighting between people in need competing to receive help. In addition, whatever funding is received has to be parsed out among the most urgent needs. Unfortunately, many donors do not see returnees as the most vulnerable or most in need of urgent assistance.

"It must be recognised that we do more harm than good when we are not able to properly cover the needs in vulnerable communities," continues Ulrika Blom. "Humanitarians are left to choose between certain people in need and leave others behind. Needs will only double, if not triple, if we continue on this path."

Our work in the area

The Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) provided USD 110 for hardware not available in local markets such as doors, windows and locks, and USD 140 for materials found in local markets. In addition, we provided USD 100 to each family targeted to cover their basic needs outside of food.

NRC’s community-based approach to programming in the localities of Mbulungu and Bakuakashila is to include the communities it serves in the assessment and prioritisation of their needs. This approach allows communities to take their assistance into their own hands, gives communities the opportunity to help target their most vulnerable and gives people in need the dignity of making their own choices. Conversely, this approach eschews ‘cookie-cutter’ assistance and discourages the wasting of valuable resources.


Braving the run

Sangamai Teka walks quickly to the plot of land she farms with several other women in the village.  They plant kidney beans and are paid with pieces of goat meat by the owner of the plot. They use this meat to feed themselves and their families. Sangamai sings with the other women in the fields and they seem, at least for now, happy.

"Without NRC’s assistance, we would have the last of the suffering.  We could have had nothing. This joy [NRC] gives us will stay forever."

Up until this point we hadn’t noticed the t-shirt Sangamai was wearing.  It’s dingy and faded black, but the lettering is unmistakable.  She couldn’t have understood the irony of the text of the shirt she chose to wear that day, because she speaks and reads no English.  But we smiled when we read the bold, white letters: ‘Brave the run’.  And that’s exactly what she and Elamegi did — they, and the over million people across Kasai-Central, braved the run.

Sangamai Teka, 41, a farmer in Mbulungu village, poses beside a burnt-out truck that was destroyed when armed groups attacked the village in March 2017.   Sangamai is one of the 3,000 people who benefited from NRC's cash-for-shelter programme in the villages of Mbulungu and Bakuakashila, Kasai-Central.

Over 1 million people have returned to their homes in Kasai-Central after a year of violent conflict within the province and across the Greater Kasai Region.  Unfortunately, people who have returned have found their homes and fields pillaged and burned to the ground.  These farming communities have no shelter, no food to eat and no means of sustaining any viable livelihood.

Earlier this year, NRC visited Mbulungu and Bakuakashila, two villages ravaged by the regional conflict in 2017.  NRC used its “community-based approach” by consulting with these communities to better understand their primary needs, to properly target the most vulnerable people and facilitate their ability to choose the assistance they require.

This intervention, however, is only a drop in the ocean of the vast needs of this community.  NRC is currently the only humanitarian actor in the zone and funding is not enough to address other acute needs such as food assistance, household items and education.  The Humanitarian Response Plan is currently only 25 per cent funded eight months into the year.  Humanitarian capacity is critically low.  If donors do not act now for the people of Mbulungu and for the rest of DR Congo, it will be too late.

August 29, 2018- Kasai-Central Province, DR Congo
Photo : NRC/Aléxis Huguet
Read caption Sangamai Teka stands beside a burnt-out truck that was destroyed when armed groups attacked the village in March 2017. Over one million people have returned to their homes in Kasai-Central after a year of violent conflict within the province and across the Greater Kasai Region. Unfortunately, people who have returned have found their homes and fields pillaged and burned to the ground. These farming communities have no shelter, no food to eat and no means of sustaining any viable livelihood.